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FNS
Answer

The Customs Broker is a highly trained import professional. Licensed by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, the Customs Broker must possess thorough knowledge of tariff schedules and Customs regulations and keep abreast of the amendments made through constant changes in law and administrative regulations.

Customs Brokers provide release instructions to U.S. Customs as well as other governmental agencies to permit the flow of imported goods. Customs Brokers classify the goods according to the HTS to apply duties and taxes owing to the Treasury Department and consults with importers on various international trade issues.
Your Customs broker should be a valuable partner on your business team... saving you time, money and a lot of headache.

FNS
Answer

HTS is short for Harmonized Tariff Schedule. Every product has a 10 digit harmonized code based on standards set by the World Trade Organization. This allows for global classification of any product.

FNS
Answer

Paperwork requirements differ in each country, but for goods entering into the United States, a commercial invoice, packing list and bill of lading will usually suffice. It must be completed properly, showing the total amount of the goods, the currency, country of origin, shipper, consignee and a detailed description of the goods.

Certain goods such as textiles, wines and spirits, GSP eligibility and food products require additional documentation, so please contact us for more information.

FNS
Answer

A Customs Broker charges a "brokerage fee" for each shipment that enters into the commerce of the United States. This is generally based on a flat fee structure depending on the complexity of the entry.

FNS
Answer

Once you have an account established with your Customs Broker, they will pay the U.S. Customs Service on your behalf, or you can opt for direct ACH payment to Customs direct.

The Customs Broker will send or fax an invoice and payment is due upon receipt of invoice. This allows for the money to be submitted timely to U.S. Customs for your product.

FNS
FNS
Answer

A customs bond or surety bond is a guarantee from a surety company to the United States government that the importer will faithfully abide by all laws and regulations governing the importation of merchandise into the United States.

FNS
Answer

A customs bond or surety bond is a guarantee from a surety company to the United States government that the importer will faithfully abide by all laws and regulations governing the importation of merchandise into the United States

U.S. customs regulations provide that a customs bond be posted for each importation of merchandise entering the United States.

When goods are imported into the United States, the importer is responsible for making the goods available to the U.S. Customs Service for inspection, ensuring that labeling and packaging requirements have been met, making transaction records available for audit and paying estimated or additional duties and fees, where applicable. The surety company issuing the bond guarantees that the importer will comply with U.S. customs regulations.

The bond is not designed or intended to protect the importer, nor does it relieve importers of any of their obligations.

The surety company issuing the bond can be called on for payment only when importers cannot or will not fulfill their obligations to the United States government; the surety company is entitled to full recovery of any loss from the importer.

The surety company assumes the importer's duties and the responsibilities. If the importer fails to honor any condition of the bond, the surety company can be obligated to do so in the importer's place.

The most common customs bond is a basic importation and entry bond. This type of bond covers the entry of goods for immediate delivery, consumption, temporary import, warehouse entry and withdrawals.

An importer may apply for a single transaction customs bond or a continuous customs bond. A single transaction bond covers only one import entry whereas a continuous customs bond remains in force for one year and must be renewed annually. The continuous customs bond also covers transactions at any U.S. Customs district or port.

In order for a broker to clear shipments on behalf of an importer, using the importer's own U.S. customs bond, the importer must provide the broker with a valid U.S. Power of Attorney and a copy of the U.S. customs bond.

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